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Nutrition

Nutrition

Wild Game Nutrition


Capt. Lewis
Tuesday January 20th 1806.

On the morning of the eighteenth we issued Salmon Fishing
At Dawn
6 lbs. of jirked Elk pr. man, this evening
the Sergt. repoted that it was all exhausted; the six lbs. have therefore lasted two days and a half only. at this rate our seven Elk will last us only 3 days longer, yet no one seems much concerned about the state of the stores; so much for habit. we have latterly so frequently had our stock of provisions reduced to a minimum and sometimes taken a small touch of fasting that three days full allowance excites no concern.

*
Wild game is high in protein and more nutritious than domestic animals because it has less fat and lower cholesterol levels.  A good diet consists of consuming food with low total fat and saturated fat while limiting the daily intake of cholesterol.  Consuming wild game can help meet these objectives because the meat is leaner and most fats should be trimmed from the meat to improve flavor.   

The nutrient values in Table 1 includes domestic meats so a comparison between domestic and wild game can be made. The species shown in bold type are those commonly harvested in the Northwest. The values contain in Tables 1 are based on 100 grams of lean meet which is about 3.5 ounces.  

Table 1
Nutrient Content of Lean Domestic and Wild Game Meats
Species
Protein %
Fat %
Cholesterol (mg/100g)
Calories (Kcal/100g)
Beef (USDA Choice)
22.0
6.5
72
180
Beef (USDA Std.)
22.7
2.0
69
152
Lamb
20.8
5.7
66
167
Pork
22.3
4.9
71
165
Wild Boar (Not Trimmed of fat)
28.3
4.38
109
160
Buffalo
21.7
1.9
62
138
Whitetail Deer
23.6
1.4
116
149
Mule Deer
23.7
1.3
107
145
Elk
22.8
0.9
67
137
Moose
22.1
0.5
71
130
Antelope
22.5
0.9
112
144
Squirrel
21.4
3.2
83
149
Cottontail
21.8
2.4
77
144
Jack rabbit
21.9
2.4
131
153
Chicken
23.6
0.7
62
135
Turkey (domestic)
23.5
1.5
60
146
Wild Turkey
25.7
1.1
55
163
Pheasant (domestic)
23.9
0.8
71
144
Wild Pheasant
25.7
0.6
52
148
Gray Partridge
25.6
0.7
85
151
Sharptail Grouse
23.8
0.7
105
142
Sage Grouse
23.7
1.1
101
140
Dove
22.9
1.8
94
145
Sandhill Crane
21.7
2.4
123
153
Snow Goose
22.7
3.6
142
121
Duck (domestic)
19.9
4.25
89
180
Mallard
23.1
2.0
140
152
Widgeon
22.6
2.1
131
153
Source:  North Dakota State University - Wild Side of Menu No. 1

Fish and Shellfish are rich in vitamins, minerals, high quality protein and low in saturated fat making them a healthy source of food.   Fish and shellfish is a good source of  Omega 3 fatty acids which has been reported to be beneficial in preventing coronary heart disease. Salmon, trout and bass are very good sources of Omega-3.   The information in Table 2 is based on 100 grams of raw fish or shellfish.


Table 2
Nutrient Content of Fish and Shellfish
Species
Protein %

Fat %

Cholesterol (mg/100 gm)
Calories
(K-cal/100mg)
Omega -3
(gm)
Bass
18.9
3.69
68
114
0.595
Crab, Dungeness
17.4
0.97
59
86
0.307
Catfish
16.38
2.82
58
95
0.364
Clam
12.77
0.97
34
74
0.142
Cod, Ling
17.6
1.059
52
84.91
-
Halibut
20.81
2.29
32
110
0.363
Oyster, Pacific
9.45
2.30
50
81
0.688
Rainbow Trout
20.48
3.46
59
119
0.587
Rockfish, Pacific
18.75
1.57
35
94
0.345
Salmon, Chinook
19.93
10.43
50
179
1.952
Salmon, Coho
21.62
5.93
45
146
1.085
Sturgeon
16.14
4.04
60
105
0.287
Walleye
19.14
1.22
86
93
0.311
Source:  U.S. Department of Agriculture Database

In order to obtain additional nutrient values for various types of wild game, fish and shellfish, you can obtain this information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database.  If you are interested in Omega 3 values you will need to look at polyunsaturated fatty acids and add the 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 values.